Rocky Strickland's Genealogy Hicks

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My line:
 
Robert Hicks (d. 1740) m. Frances
 James (d. 1762) m. Martha
  Benjamin Hicks m. Lucy Delony
   Lucy D. Hicks m. Ludwell Jones
    Thomas L. Jones (1822-1895) m. Mary Puryear (1829-1856)
     Elizabeth Jones (1855-1925) m. John N. Cole (1852-1915)
      Lucy Cole (1882-1958) m. Plato Tracy Durham (1873-1930)
       Lucy Cole Durham (1925-2008) m. Roscoe Lee Strickland, Jr. (1917-1997)
        Roscoe Lee Strickland III

The present town of Emporia, Virginia, was once called Hicksford.  The name evolved from the spot on the Meherrin River where Capt. Robert Hicks had his trading post.  It was at a shallow point that was fordable and became known as Hicks' or Hix's Ford.  It is believed that the villages of Hicksford, located on the south side of the river, and Belfield, located on the north side of the river, were combined in the late 1880's to become Emporia.
 
Robert Hicks was captain of the garrison that Governor Spottswood installed at Fort Christianna in Brunswick County in 1714.  Captain Hicks went with Governor Spottswood to Albany, New York, in 1722, to negotiate a treaty with the Iroquois Indians.  In 1728, he accompanied Colonel William Byrd and the commission that surveyed the boundary line between North Carolina and Virginia.
 
Robert Hicks first appeared in Charles City County (afterwards Prince George) records.  In 1690, John Evans, Robert's father-in-law, gave 560 acres adjoining General Wood's land to Robert Hicks and his wife, Winifred Hicks.  On April 13, 1693, Robert Hicks appeared in Charles City County Court in a drunken state and was sentenced to the stocks.  His father-in-law soon afterward gave him another 1120 acres of land on the south side of the Appomattox, and shortly thereafter, Hicks claimed 600 acres for transporting twelve persons into the colony.  He is mentioned numerous times in Brunswick County land records up until the late 1730's.
 
The will of Robert Hicks, Gentleman, was dated March 6, 1739, and proved February 7, 1740. To his son, Charles Hicks, all my land at the Indian Fort containing 650 acres adjacent to Nathaniel Edwards, and 150 acres lying in the Fork of Reeves.  To son, James Hicks, the plantation whereon I now live after the death of wife, whatever is left of patent of 2610 acres. To son, George Hicks, tract of land adjacent to his land.  To son-in-law, Richard Ransom, 150 acres lying in the Fork of Reeves.  To grandson, Benjamin Hicks (son of Daniel Hicks, deceased son of Robert), 150 acres in Fork of Reeves. Daughters, Martha Beddingfield, Frances Ransom, Elizabeth Hicks, Rachel Hicks, Mary Hicks, and Tabitha Hicks.  To grandson, John Beddingfield, all my part of the Mill on Genito's Creek.  Wife, Frances Hicks, named as executrix.  Witnesses were Ann Poythress, Charles Rose, and John Chapman (Brunswick County, Virginia, Will Book 2, page 4).

James Hicks was named in the will of his father, Robert Hicks, dated March 6, 1739, and proved February 7, 1740.  He was left the plantation whereon I now live after the death of wife, whatever is left of patent of 2610 acres (Brunswick County, Virginia, Will Book 2, page 4).
 
James Hicks was named in the will of his mother, Frances Hicks, dated May 7, 1744, and proved July 5, 1744.  He and his brother, George, were executors (Brunswick County Will Book 2, page 93).
 
James Hicks is also mentioned many times in Brunswick County land records.

Benjamin Hicks owned land in Brunswick County, Virginia.  He was named in the will of his father, James Hicks, in 1760.  In 1771 and 1772, he purchased property on Great Creek, and in October, 1777, he and his wife sold their lands in Brunswick County.  It was at this time, it is believed, that the family moved to Cheraw District (now Chesterfield County), South Carolina.
 
In the spring of 1780, during the Revolutionary War, the British fources invaded South Carolina. Many American patriots were driven from the Cheraw area, their slaves being seized and freed. Benjamin's house was burned and he returned to Hicks' Ford in Brunswick County, Virginia. He registered his 53 slaves, as the tories were setting them all free (Brunswick County, Virginia, Deed Book 14, page 101).  One slave named Brandum, aged 45, was on the list.  A slave of that name was willed to Benjamin by his father, James Hicks, in 1760.
 
In 1781, Greensville County was formed from the eastern portion of Brunswick, and Hicks' Ford fell in the new county.  Benjamin Hicks was appointed surveyor for Greensville, County, and during the same year was granted a license to operate an ordinary (tavern) at Hicks' Ford. He continued to appear in the records of Greensville County as late as 1785.

Visit Carol Morrison's Hicks Family Research website.

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