Rocky Strickland's Genealogy Sugars

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My line:
 
John Sugars (ca. 1664-1727) m. Elizabeth
 Abigail Sugars (1702-1790) m. Edward Jones (1702-1751)
  Robert Jones (1752-1815) m. Ann Duke (d. 1810)
   Elizabeth Swann Jones (b. 1783) m. Robert Jones
    Mary Ann Jones (1815-1859) m. Doctor Cole (1798-1859)
     John N. Cole (1852-1915) m. Elizabeth M. Jones (1855-1925)
      Lucy Cole (1882-1958) m. Plato Tracy Durham (1873-1930)
       Lucy Cole Durham (1925-2008) m. Roscoe Lee Strickland, Jr. (1917-1997)
        Roscoe Lee Strickland III

Family tradition is that the Sugars were Huguenots who emigrated from France and settled in Virginia. The name is found in various records spelled several ways: Sugar, Sugars, Suger, Shugar, Sheugars, Sugan, and Shugan.
 
The Sugars family was in Virginia prior to the founding of the Manakin Town settlement by new immigrants in 1700. There is a record in Surry County, Virginia, of a John Sugars, who first married Elizabeth Clay, widow of Thomas Clay, in 1688 (W.B. 2, p. 40). His second wife was also named Elizabeth, widow of John Drew (B.K. 1711, p. 48).

Abigail Sugars was named in the will of her father, John Sugars, dated December 1, 1726, and probated in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, on September 25, 1727. Legatees were daughter Elizabeth Bynum; daughter Abigail Jones, the land upon which Edward Jones lives; daughter Priscilla; grandson Sugar Jones; wife Elizabeth, Executrix. Witnesses were Francis Arrington, George Bruton, and Mary Walker (Isle of Wight County Will Book III, p. 45). In 1736, Abigail and her husband successfully petitioned the sheriff of Isle of Wight County for permission to sell 80 acres of land, valued at 25, on Malvern River that was Abigail's by inheritance. The petition refers to other lands of hers, which were entailed so as to be unsalable at the time.
 
John Sugars' will was dated December 1, 1726, and it was proved in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, on September 27, 1727. Legatees were daughter Elizabeth Bynum; daughter Abigail Jones, the land upon which Edward Jones lives; daughter Priscilla; grandson Sugar Jones; wife Elizabeth, Executrix. Witnesses were Francis Arrington, George Bruton, and Mary Walker (Isle of Wight County Will Book III, p. 45).
 
Abigail was, according to family tradition, a strong woman well qualified to meet the demands of pioneer life. She was one of the first women to cross the Roanoke River and settle in the area that is now Warren County, North Carolina.
 
The following was taken from John Saunders Diary and Account Book, which included an account of his journey to North Carolina in 1753. The diary was discovered in 1863 by a Union solder in Edenton, North Carolina, and it is now in the North Carolina Archives in Raleigh.
 
"Tuesday, September 4, 1753. Got to great Fishing Creek and in nine miles more got to our quarters at Mrs. Jones' on Shocco Creek. Next morning set out again, and 18 miles riding got to Granville Court House, where I saw many odd sceines. The justices on the bench appeared like gladiators stript ready for fighting and the petty jury like pannels at the bar. I heard many curious tryals for assault and battery, but must needs say the debates of the lawyers were rather obscene than learned, but was much surpriz'd to see my last night's landlady indicted for fornication. She came into court and submitted to the mercy of the court and owned the fact, upon which she was fined five pound and the fellow 20 pound to her shame. Be it spoken, she is relict of the late Burgess to whom she bore seven children, though he would not own 2 off them. I must owe that our landlady at court was a meer towwowse, altho no less than a Colos. lady. After seeing variety of sceines, I lay down on the bed, not dareing to venture in the sheets, not being over clean."
 
A silver pipe, engraved "A. Jones," was given to Abigail Jones by her grandson-in-law, Bishop John Early. The pipe was a gift to the North Carolina Museum of History by her great-great-great-grandsons, William Duke Jones and Bignall Speed Jones ("Silversmiths of North Carolina 1696-1860," pp. 251-2, includes a picture).

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